Buy-to-let: strike five

Posted: Jun 24, 2016

The buy-to-let sector is under Treasury attack

The government appears to have taken aim at buy-to-let investors in its efforts to help "generation rent" become first time buyers.

In the last year there have been five important announcements:

1. A phased reduction in tax relief for mortgage interest down to 20% by 2020/21;

2. The replacement in 2016/17 of the 10% wear-and-tear allowance with one based on costs the landlord has actually incurred;

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How much lower for longer?

Posted: Jun 24, 2016

March 2016 marked the seventh anniversary of a 0.5% Bank of England base rate, but other interest rates are still falling. 

"Lower for longer" is now a commonly used phrase when economists and bankers discuss the future of interest rates. The view is supported by banks and other deposit takers, which continue to reduce savers' rates. Shortly after Easter, National Savings & Investments (NS&I) joined the rate cutters. From June Income Bonds and the Direct ISA will then pay only 1%.

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On the lookout for LISA

Posted: Jun 24, 2016

Will next year's Lifetime ISA be a real pension alternative?

The rumour machine that operates before each year's Budget went into overdrive in 2016. First there was a steady flow of stories about changes to pensions that would see flat rate tax relief replace full income tax relief on pension contributions. Then, shortly before the Budget, there was a widely covered unofficial statement that the Chancellor had decided to make no changes. As it turned out, both rumours had an element of truth.

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Budget 2016 tax changes: new moves

Posted: Jun 29, 2016

This year's Budget contained many measures which could affect your long term financial planning.

Budgets have become a regular feature of the financial landscape. The March 2016 Budget is the third in twelve months and it revealed some important tax changes:

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Brexit Fallout: what are the implications?

Posted: Sep 18, 2016

The implications for investors of the result of the UK referendum on EU membership will be played out over the months ahead and it is very likely that volatility will persist in the near term. Although we understand investors' concerns, you should not need to make dramatic changes, provided you have a well-diversified portfolio.

 

 

Financial risk needs a different reaction

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Planning for the unexpected

Posted: Sep 18, 2016

The unexpected sometimes happens. The Brexit result, for example, came as a surprise to the bookies, pollsters and markets. On a personal level, how ready are you and your family for the unexpected?

 

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Beware the Autumn Statement

Posted: Sep 19, 2016

This year's Autumn Statement will be the Treasury's first post-Brexit set piece. It will not be an easy exercise.

 

Before the referendum, the then Chancellor George Osborne warned that a Leave vote would be followed by an emergency Budget with £30bn of tax increases and spending cuts. After he found himself on the losing side, Mr Osborne abandoned not only his Budget plans but also his target to end fresh government borrowing by 2020.

 

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How much are you prepared to risk?

Posted: Sep 19, 2016

The outcome of the EU referendum was a reminder that risk comes in many forms, including political risk. Following the decision to leave the institution that has been a core part of our economic and political lives in one form or another for 43 years. We have also seen a change of Prime Minister in mid-term and a vote of no confidence in the leader of the main opposition party. On a national level, that's a lot of risk.

 

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